The Civil Liability Act 2018 received royal assent on 20 December 2018.  Following this, on 15 July 2019 the Lord Chancellor announced that the new discount rate would be set at -0.25% (to be reviewed in five years’ time).  However, despite the obvious progress of the Civil Liability Bill becoming an Act and the discount rate having been confirmed, much still remains unclear with no sign of an update in sight.

Lessons for everyone – civil practitioners, family lawyers, and judges alike – in the Court of Appeal’s judgment in Re M (for which the case report is awaited).

The appellant was arrested on suspicion of harassment but was later released without charge, after police had taken fingerprints and DNA samples. The appellant issued a claim for false imprisonment and assault.

In the majority of road traffic based personal injury claims, speed is often raised as an allegation of negligence.  Witness statements abound with comments that the other driver ‘must’ve been speeding’ and even, my personal favourite, that ‘they sounded like they were speeding’.  To what extent though does the speed of the other driver absolve the negligent driver?  The High Court has considered this question in a recent case involving a motorcyclist, a side road and bank holiday driving.

Newham London Borough Council v Arboleda-Quiceno QBD (Lambert J) 31/07/2019

The defendant local authority appealed against a master’s refusal of permission to withdraw a pre-action admission made by its insurer.

The  Lord Chancellor today announced that the discount rate will be minus 0.25%. The practical implications of this need to be considered. In particular practitioners may struggle to find tables with  – 0.25% guidance.  Zenith will post details of guidance as soon as it is received.   “Personal Injury Discount Rate – Statement from the Lord […]

The new whiplash portal is due to launch in the spring of 2020. It is likely to cover injuries arising from accidents occurring after 6th April.